One hand push pass

Written by Super User. Posted in Passing

The one hand push pass is used more frequently when trying to counter a closely guarding defender. Good balance and control is necessary. A cross over step in front of the defender and toward the receiver may help protect the ball. A pass may be made directly to the receiver or a one hand bounce pass might be more appropriate. In some cases the action may be similar to a baseball pass except the pass is made from about waist level rather than above the shoulder.

Baseball pass

Written by Super User. Posted in Passing

The baseball pass is most often used for longer distance for example when making a long outlet pass after a rebound, or perhaps when a full court pass is needed to reduce the time advancing the ball to the front court .Assuming a right hand pass, the ball is brought up to just behind the right ear. The left arm is used for balance and extended out pointing in the direction of the pass. All of the body weight is on the pivot foot, in this case the right foot. The left foot is raised and as a step forward is taken the right hand propels the ball forward. The right arm is fully extended in the direction of the pass and the right foot steps forward to complete the action.

Bounce pass

Written by Super User. Posted in Passing

The bounce pass is executed in the same way as the chest pass, The receiver provides a good target but in order to reach the target the passer must bounce the ball just beyond the feet of the defender ensuring the ball bounces up to about the level of the waist of the receiver. The bounce pass is slower than the chest pass but sometimes necessary to counter the defender who carries his hands high in an effort to deflect a chest pass.

Overhead pass

Written by Super User. Posted in Passing

The overhead pass is useful when being defended closely. A quick fake and a pass over the head of the defender can be effective especially when trying to feed a player cutting to the basket, or making an outlet pass after a rebound. The ball is raised above the head with arms almost fully extended. Drop the elbows and with a strong wrist action while stepping forward the ball is released. The hands are turned inside as with the chest pass and thumbs pointing down . There is not the same full arm extension like the chest pass, as you are more likely to make contact with the closely guarding defender, but more of a “snapping motion”.

Chest pass

Written by Super User. Posted in Passing

The two hand chest pass is the first pass to master. The fingers of both hands are on the ball with the thumbs behind it. The ball should be held comfortably at just below chest height. The there is a slight lowering of the ball as if starting to draw a circle outwards then inwards and upwards. This rotation of the ball enables a forward thrust toward the target. In doing so the passer makes a short step forward to maintain balance and increase the power of the pass. At the completion of the pass the arms are fully extended and the hands are turned inside out with the thumbs pointing down.